ACPS-TV

  • Refer to the TV Learning Handbook (PDF)

    Monday through Friday while our schools remain closed, ACPS-TV will be screening 90 minutes of educational science programming from the National science Foundation and The Smithsonian’s “Science How” and “Stem in 30” series from 12 p.m. through 8 p.m., beginning Tuesday, April 14.

    Use these series with your children to ensure continuity of education while schools are closed.

    See the upcoming schedule below:

    ACPS-TV Schedule

     
    FRIDAY, April 3

    The Evolution of Agriculture in Ants

    This video features Dr. Ted Schultz, an entomologist at the National Museum of Natural History. Learn about the creatures that are responsible for processing more vegetation than any animal on earth, the leaf-cutter ants. Take a journey with Ted to meet the leaf-cutters in his laboratory and witness their remarkable farming abilities. Think about how their agricultural systems compare to ours. Find out more about how entomologists like Ted are piecing together the evolutionary history of farming in ants.


    Taking the Fast Lane to Orbit: The Technology of Rockets and Race Cars

    Many of the technologies used in NASCAR are the same as those used in space travel, and many of the forces that keep a plane in the air also keep a racecar on the road. We were live from the NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, North Carolina to take a look at the crossover between these forces and technologies.

    The SR-71 Blackbird

    In this episode of STEM in 30 we feature the SR-71 Blackbird on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center and explore why it was so important for reconnaissance.

     

    TUESDAY, APRIL 14

     

     

    • The Biology of Long-Term Spaceflight

     

    Since the first humans launched into space in 1961, there have been questions about how the human body would react to being beyond Earth’s atmosphere. While most of the basic questions have been answered, many remain, and are the basis for continued research on the International Space Station. Finding answers to these questions is an important step toward sending humans to Mars. Join STEM in 30 as we explore this research and the impact of long-term space travel on the human body.

    This program is made possible through the generous support of Gertrude E. Skelly Charitable Foundation. 

     

     

    • Taking the Fast Lane to Orbit: The Technology of Rockets and Race Cars

     

    Many of the technologies used in NASCAR are the same as those used in space travel, and many of the forces that keep a plane in the air also keep a racecar on the road. We were live from the NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, North Carolina to take a look at the crossover between these forces and technologies.

     

     

    • The Process of Invention

     

    Before they built airplanes, the Wright brothers built bicycles. This episode of STEM in 30 will be broadcast live from inside the Wright brothers’ bicycle shop at Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan.

     

    WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15

     

     

    • Science 360:  Dispatches from the Cutting Edge

     

    In this episode: WIFIRE, solar superstorms, what you never learned about mass, Alaska Fire and Ice and more!

     

     

    • Lighter, Stronger, Better: Composites

     

    This episode, which originated from the museum, examines composites and how these engineered materials are used in the aerospace industry.

     

     

    • World War I: Legacy, Letters, and Belgian War Lace

     

    In this STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, math) inspired STEM in 30, we’ll take a look at some of the technological advances of World War I that solidified the airplane’s legacy as a fighting machine. In conjunction with the Embassy of Belgium, we’ll also dive deep into how the war affected the lives of children in an occupied country and how lacemakers helped feed a nation. The episode will also look at present works of art by artist soldiers on display in the Artist Soldiers: Artistic Expression in the First World War exhibition.

     

    THURSDAY, APRIL 16

     

     

    • ISS: 15 Years of Continuous Human Presence

     

    In the lifetime of today’s middle school students, there hasn’t been a day without a human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS). This episode of STEM in 30 celebrates the 15th anniversary of continuous occupation of the space station and looks at the incredible accomplishments of the last 15 years



     

    • Science 360:  Dispatches from the Cutting Edge

     

    In this episode: 4 Awesome Discoveries, improving watermelon, Robotic control, Food, Water, and Energy connections in Igiugig, Alaska, transforming waste CO2, sunscreen from fish and more!

     

     

    • Exploring the Solar System with Antarctic Meteorites

     

    This video features Dr. Cari Corrigan, geologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Have you ever considered what meteorites reveal about our early solar system? A meteorite is a piece of rock that has come from far away in space and time. Cari analyzes meteorites that have landed in Antarctica to find evidence of the history of planets. See how the structure and composition of each meteorite is interpreted using modern laboratory techniques. Take a journey with Cari to Mars and back to get a new perspective on a planet that once had water like Earth.



    FRIDAY, APRIL 17

     

     

    • Science 360:  Dispatches from the Cutting Edge

     

    In this episode: Water tracks in the arctic, what is a telescope, exploring the rainforest with the Native American and Pacific Islander Research Experience, ink from algae and more! 

     

     

    • Star Trek at 50: Science Fiction to Science Fact

     

    In recognition of the premiere of Star Trek, 50 years ago this September, this episode of STEM in 30 explores how one of the most popular shows in television history has inspired generations of scientists, astronauts, and engineers, and introduced many technologies that have gone from science fiction to science reality.

     

    • WWII and Tuskegee Airmen

     

    In celebration of the anniversary of the Wilbur and Orville Wright's historic first flight in 1903, this fast-paced webcast gives students an introduction to the Wright brothers and the process of innovation. The program uses the Wright Flyer as a starting point to explore the concepts of flight.

     

    About ACPS-TV

    ACPS-TV may be viewed on cable channel 71 within the City of Alexandria. During the day, ACPS-TV offers a bulletin board featuring school and division-wide news, student- and division-produced video content, clips from student concerts, upcoming events, menu items for the day, the weather and more.

    Each evening at 7 p.m., the station streams video content, including school board and community meetings and Smithsonian science programming content, obtained free from the Smithsonian Institution. Viewers may also find many ACPS and school videos are archived on our YouTube channel for online viewing.

    School Board meetings may also be viewed with closed captioning on the School Board Meetings page.

    T.C. Williams TV Studio

    The ACPS television station operates out of the studio at T.C. Williams High School. Training is provided at the studio to teachers and staff interested in utilizing the facilities to produce material for ACPS-TV.

    Students use the studio to produce such programming as news magazines, public service announcements, comedies and parodies. Schools have produced talk shows, student-created variety shows and videos for instruction and documenting classroom projects.

    ACPS-TV:

    • has been online since January 15, 1999, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year
    • can be accessed online and in the homes of more than 55,000 cable subscribers in the City of Alexandria
    • is distributed from its studio facility located in T.C. Williams High School
    • interrupts regular programming to continually display emergency announcements (school closings, early dismissals, etc.)

    Comments or questions regarding ACPS-TV should be directed to the Office of Communications at news@acps.k12.va.us.