Restorative Practices

  • What is Restorative Practices?

    Restorative Practices is a framework that supports the idea that positive relationships are essential to maintaining community and repairing relationships when harm has occurred.

    Why do we use Restorative Practices?

    We use Restorative Practices to build relationships and to restore broken relationships, rather than simply assigning punishment. This is particularly important in the school setting, where students of color, those with disabilities, and other marginalized groups have been shown to be disproportionately targeted by exclusionary forms of traditional discipline such as suspensions and expulsions.

    How do we use Restorative Practices?

    Restorative Practices include both informal and formal approaches such as affective statements, affective questions, small impromptu conference, group or circle and formal conferences. Restorative Practices provides students and teachers with proactive methods and procedures for responding to issues of school discipline. Restorative Practices adhere to the principle that every instance of conflict is an opportunity for learning and restoration.

    How do students benefit from Restorative Practices?

    Restorative Practices teach and model positive social skills such as sharing, listening, empathizing and problem solving, which help to create emotionally and physically safe learning environments that promote respect, trust and accountability. Most importantly, Restorative Practices give all students a voice.

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  • CONTACT INFORMATION

    Gregory Baldwin
    School Climate and Culture Specialist
    Department of Student Services, Alternative Programs and Equity

    ACPS Central Office
    1340 Braddock Place, Suite 510
    Alexandria, VA 22314
    703-619-8034

    gbaldwin@acps.k12.va.us

  • Restorative News

    ACPS Department of Student Services, Alternative Programs and Equity representatives Gregory Baldwin and Tara Newton presented at the 2018 International Institute for Restorative Practices (IIRP) World Conference in Detroit, Michigan. The presentation was entitled, “Restorative Practices Responses to Student Absenteeism: An Exploration of Racial Microaggressions and Student Self-Efficacy. IIRP is one of the world’s leading organizations in the field of restorative practices. Discover more.

    ACPS School Climate and Culture Specialist and Coordinator of ACPS Restorative Practices, Gregory Baldwin was invited to attend Harvard University's Restorative Justice at the Intersections of Indigeneity, Spirituality, and Race Workshop. This was an intensive three-day interactive and experiential training that explores the origins, principles, and practices of restorative justice, with a special emphasis on its intersections with spirituality, indigeneity, racial justice, and peace-building. Discover more.